Agreement Uh-Huh

I think the expression is an expression of disbelief (perhaps sarcastic or difficult) or disagreement, etc., and should not be taken at face value. It would therefore most likely be an interpellation, a response in the conversation / dialogue. What does this mean, for example? phooey – gentle interpellation used to show disagreements or disbelievers; even a slight swear word similar to damned or drat, but prequois In my experience, it can also indicate approval (if accompanied by a nod). So these are five possible meanings. arrr – The pirate sound of the chord; Call from mm-hmm hackers – Consent noise that can also indicate inattention; a bit like uh-huh nuh-uh – non-argumentative childish; in front of yuh-huh; [Focus on uh] It is easy to convey to the reader the intention of the words, because I hope that the person we are talking to will understand the intention, and therefore his reaction will tell the reader what was meant by growling. Personally, I do my best to never cedar my readers and hit them on the head with explanations on every detail, and instead rely on clues that allow me to “show them, not tell them”. Even if you have a better idea towards !whew hoo! (From the movie Frozen), I`m the whole ear. The store owner says, “Ouh hoo, hello family!” It greatly increases its height at the end of Whew and Hoo. My daughter suggested it might be better than You Who!???? This list is great, Beth, and thank you for all the hard work and effort put into this simple but surprisingly useful compilation of “sounds we make but can`t find the words”! I have never confirmed it, but I am convinced that “he” and “erm”, which appear in British and older American novels, should simply be pronounced as “uh” and “uh”. Most variations of British, Scottish, and Irish accents tend to pronounce words that end on “-er” closer to “-ah” or “-uh”. Part of the reason I think I`ve never been someone in my life (Americans, English, Irish, Australians, etc.) “he” or “erm” has heard – at least not the r. . .