Wto Agreement On Agriculture Notes

At the WTO Ministerial Conference in Bali, Indonesia, in 2013, ministers also agreed on a range of agriculture-related issues. The agricultural negotiations under the Uruguay Round were not easy, as the broad scope of the negotiations and their political sensitivity inevitably took a long time to reach agreement on the new rules and it took a great deal of technical work to create solid means to formalize commitments in policy areas beyond the scope of previous GATT practice. The agreement on agriculture and the agreement on the application of health and plant health measures were negotiated in parallel and a decision on the possible negative impacts of the reform programme on the least developed developing countries and net food-importing developing countries was also part of the overall outcome. (2) In accordance with the mid-term review agreement, which provides that direct or indirect state aid to promote agricultural and rural development is an integral part of development programmes in developing countries, investment aid generally made available to agriculture in developing countries, and agricultural input subsidies, which are generally available to low- and low-income producers in developing countries. , are excluded from commitments to reduce national aid which, if not, would apply to measures that would otherwise apply to such measures. , as well as national aid to producers in developing countries, which encourage diversification through the cultivation of illicit stunning plants. National aid meeting the criteria set out in this paragraph should not be taken into account in the calculation of the current AMS of the total number of Member States. Noting that commitments made under the reform programme should be made fairly by all MEPs, taking into account non-trade issues, including food security and the need to protect the environment; Recalling the agreement that the special and differentiated treatment of developing countries is an integral part of the negotiations and given the negative effects that the implementation of the reform programme could have on the least developed developing countries and net food-importing developing countries, the CAP is also affected by land concessions granted to several multilateral and bilateral agreements under several multilateral and bilateral agreements. , as well as unilateral exemptions under the Generalized Preference System (GSP). These preferential agreements explain the high level of EU agricultural imports from developing countries (3.2.10, Table VI).

Before the Uruguay Round negotiations, it became increasingly clear that the causes of confusion in global agriculture went beyond the import access problems, which had been the traditional centre of gravity of the GATT negotiations.